settled

tags: , , ,

His father

They’ve been together for 4 years. He’s only 21, it doesn‘t feel right. When I was his age I’d wake up in the morning, call my mates and we’d be in Athens by noon. We weren’t rich, we would find ourselves work there, stay all summer, make it up as we went along, We could get by. Don’t get me wrong, I love my wife, we’ve been together for 20 years, but I wouldn’t do it again. Wouldn’t get married again.

A bee bumbled between us

At 21 he should be seeing the world, not settling down, there’s plenty of time to settle down later.

Her mother

He‘s got no money, he doesn‘t go out, he just sits in front of the TV and eats junk food. He can‘t cook. He’s doing a computer games degree course. He’s written one game and even she thinks its crap. She’s insecure and he’s a safe bet, she doesn’t love him so he can’t hurt her. His mother visits every week to deliver the folded, bagged, fresh laundry and pick up the stuff that needs washing. He doesn’t even take the laundry out of the bag. His mother does my daughters laundry too. They’ve got no life in them

candlelight flickers across her damp eyes

He’s a couch potato and he’s making her into one.


PS thank you to Ben and Alison. Love you. 223 word post before the PS
settled
2 votes rating 5

6 bits of lovely banter on “settled”

  1. Brian writes:

    Wow, this rings eerily true, and I’m not even sure exactly why. I don’t know anyone in exactly that situation, but the unwritten message between the lines is resonating strongly with me. I can’t quite put it into words just yet, so I’ll be coming back to this again…

       0 likes

    [reply]

    wendy writes

    Thanks Brian, its really good to hear that it feels eerily true. It’s actually really difficult to make stuff up based on a vague idea, this was based on an idea that kids are less active and more looked after than they were 40 years ago.

       0 likes

    [reply]

    Brian writes

    “They’ve got no life in them” is a telling phrase. It also rings true about the guy’s mother acting as an enabler of this, which then retroactively reframes his father’s remarks that he wouldn’t get married again. I know of people with “no life in them” and also some enablers (who think they’re helping the person they’re enabling) so this one hit close to home for me.

       0 likes

    [reply]

    wendy writes

    you’ve inspired me to write a companion piece, his mother (the enabler) and her father (as-yet unknown character) that will draw more of the adult relationships by commenting on their kids situations. Your comments are really encouraging.

       0 likes

  2. jenn writes:

    I like that we hear two parents talking so we only know the couple through their eyes. Simple, unusual yet still very easy to follow.

       0 likes

    [reply]

    wendy writes

    Wow! my natural tendancy is towards obscure verbosity so to have someone say simple and easy to follow is really high prasie indeed – thanks so much Jenn!

       0 likes

    [reply]

share your wonderful musings

*
To prove you're a person (not a spam script), type the security word shown in the picture. Click on the picture to hear an audio file of the word.
Anti-spam image