one magnetic way

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Labyrinths have a a physical pull, a gravity. They pull you into their pathway. Unlike a maze they provide a single pathway, there are no tyrannous choices. You walk the gentle curves that wind you slowly and steadily towards the centre. If several people walk the labrynth one after another,  they can seem to be walking in opposite dirctions, passing each other several times on their journey towards the centre. This passing prompts smiles, laughter, greetings and an acknowledgement of the shared destiny. The meeting in the middle.

There are 3 modern labrynths on the Ridgeway by Streatley. They are constructed from small trenches and rises in the ground, the rises are marked with sparsely placed local stone, flint.  The low hung sunlight of the summer solstice helped to highlight their presence and draw us in…

Walking the Labrynths

one magnetic way
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4 bits of lovely banter on “one magnetic way”

  1. Scarlet writes:

    Happy Christmas, Wendy!
    Sxxxx

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    wendy writes

    Happy Christmas Scarlet and other visitors 🙂 Peace, love and happiness all around …

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  2. Kay Guest writes:

    Labyrinths are almost always mistaken as mazes here in the USA. Several of the Anglican churches have them, either inside the church building in stone, or outside made of stones placed upon the grass. Never actually seen one myself, but then, I don’t get out much.
    Hope you have a happy Christmas!

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    wendy writes

    i find them fascinating in their simplicity and impact – I didn’t realise this pre-chriistian symbol had been adopted by some Anglican churches. Hope you”ve had a special day, w x

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