leaving Worthing

tags: , , , , , ,

1pm 14th August

Worthing hosppital gave me a CD with my data on it. They told me this includes notes and X-Ray. I was to carry this information to the Royal Berkshire Hospital (RBH) in Reading town. Apparantly, human hand delivery is more secure and reliable than using a cloud based system or encrypted email….

I was impressed that the two hospitals use compatible healthcare software so they can share electronic data. This assumption was wrong. I thought I was being transferred.  This assumption was also wrong. I was told that the RBH fracture clinic was expecting me at 8am on the August 16th. Guess what? Sigh…

view from Worthing PierTime to catch a few busses and a few trains…

When you’ve got a broken arm everything takes longer and people are more able to offer help… an elderly gentleman helped me to carry my small bag onto a bus.

 8pm 14th August: Arriving in Reading

Home with my cuddly kitty, fresh bed linen, and tea on tap. A wonderful sense of relief.

A long journey in less than 2 days and more to come…

 

leaving Worthing
3 votes rating 2.7

7 bits of lovely banter on “leaving Worthing”

  1. James Sutherland writes:

    The NHS has always struggled with complicated processes like “move some pieces of paper/computer files from A to B”; back in the 90s, I happened to attend a briefing on their planned new electronic file exchange. Each night, sites would be polled by modem for outgoing file transfers and receive incoming ones, provided by an outside contractor and charged by the kilobyte. Each file would go to the central server one night, then on to the destination the next. I pointed out afterwards that the proposed system was both slower and more expensive than sending floppy disks by next-day courier.

    When I moved back from Cambridge to Perth, I re-registered with my original Perth GP. They had to open a new temporary patient file, because it took THREE MONTHS for my paper records to make the 500 mile journey (with a detour via Aberdeen for no discernible reason). My suggestion they investigate this new-fangled technology known as “a stamp” fell on deaf ears; as for doing anything electronically, forget it.

       1 likes

    [reply]

    wendy writes

    James – interesting! They may be onto something with giving the notes to the patient to carry! The NHS lost my notes when I moved to the USA so they only have files on me since 2007 when I returned. Judging by the size of the paper folder in the RBH (about 4 inches thick for one incident – and they left it open, near me, so I’ve read it) the folder they have lost was HUGE!

       0 likes

    [reply]

  2. Kay G. writes:

    That cup of tea sounds really nice. Tea is life-giving to me and I hope it is for you!

       1 likes

    [reply]

    wendy writes

    Kay, Oh yes! The loveliness of home and tea was emphasised so much by having been without it’s simple comforts for a couple of days

       0 likes

    [reply]

  3. Indigo Roth writes:

    Hey Wendy, I think they just don’t WANT to interract! A DISK?! How bloody primitive and insecure is that? A physical thing that can be lost or stolen? Or CHANGED?! Good grief, an encrypted e-mail, cloud storage, or even Royal Mail is so much better than that! Stupid. Glad you;re home and that you’re on the mend. Keep at it =) Indigo

       1 likes

    [reply]

  4. Scarlet writes:

    Would you like me to come and yell at someone?
    Sx

       1 likes

    [reply]

  5. wendy writes:

    Indigo, Scarlet, I suspect that if you’d been stood by my side then there would have been a lotr less crying and things would have been more efficient. I need an NHS advocate – and I’m healthy and opinionated. It must be aweful for people with chronic illnesses or inferiority complexes. Luckily I am passed the worst – but this story isn’t….

       0 likes

    [reply]

share your wonderful musings

*
To prove you're a person (not a spam script), type the security word shown in the picture. Click on the picture to hear an audio file of the word.
Anti-spam image