Ordinal 466 (559) could not be located in the dynamic link library

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After an irritating long windows update when I was trying to leave work on time, my laptop starts with these trust inspiring messages:
Ordinal 466 Ordinal 559

Several friends experience similar messages after their updates. What’s an ordinal? Do I care? Dynamic link library? Seriously?!

What were the windows update test team doing when they let these error messages slip through before releasing?

Oh, and I almost forgot this confidence inducing message: ‘The operating system cannot run %1’
Operating system cannot run

Ordinal 466 (559) could not be located in the dynamic link library
4 votes rating 3.75

5 bits of lovely banter on “Ordinal 466 (559) could not be located in the dynamic link library”

  1. Indigo Roth writes:

    Don;t forget the exciting sounding SysWOW64! *gasp*

    And yes, WTF?!

       1 likes

    [reply]

  2. wendy writes:

    sysWOW64! Soon I’ll have enough common and bizarre windows error messages to set-up a game of error message bingo!

       0 likes

    [reply]

    Indigo Roth writes

    My favourite Zen error message, from a fiction I wrote years ago…

    Disk Error:
    Your data is truly lost
    And truth is beauty
    Enjoy the beauty of this event

    Indigo x

       0 likes

    [reply]

  3. James Sutherland writes:

    SysWOW64 is the exciting new alias for the old ‘System32’ directory – since the Wendy-PC is running 64 bit Windows, which puts the new 64 bit stuff in System32 to confuse people, it has to find somewhere new to put the leftover bits of 32 bit Windows so 32 bit software can run happily. (So, the 32 bit code is in SysWOW64, the 64 bit in System32…) WOW64 is Windows-on-Windows: bits of 32 bit Windows, packaged up with an adapter to run on top of 64 bit Windows.

    An ordinal, in this context, is the number of a function within a dynamic link library (DLL file). Short version: you’ve got a slightly mangled copy of Internet Explorer (more precisely, I think, the bit which supports 32 bit IE on 64 bit Windows). Those applications, like ie4uinit.exe, were trying to use a function within IE which isn’t there now.

    “sfc /scannow” and a reboot might help, but the ie4uinit issue actually crept into 32 bit Windows XP back in either Service Pack 2 or Service Pack 3. Is this a corporate laptop with company settings on?

       1 likes

    [reply]

    wendy writes

    James, your foreign accent is so cute!

       0 likes

    [reply]

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