scribbles tagged ‘Bambi’

snow melt

Monday, January 4th, 2010 | tags: , , , ,  |

The snow is disappearing to the sound of modern English’s optimistic little ditty.   This  song came to my attention on a compilation  audio tape cassette that Bambi used as part of his courting ritual.  

Modern English sang I melt with you

snow melt
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the bells

Monday, April 13th, 2009 | tags: , , ,  |

Goth?  1986First love was a roller coaster.

The highs involved lashings of peanut butter sandwiches, outlandish hairstyles and jewellery,   singing and dancing in the streets, railway stations, buses, bedrooms, and on beaches.     We could  harmonise with each other and sing every  track by EBTG.

He had a penchant for spontaneous immitations of  Jack Russel terriers.

My  perfromance fruit was, and still is,    uniquely engaging (and available for appropriate inducements and parties).

Love on a shoestring budget with a wealth of imagination was bright, distracting, and fulfilling  if  haunted by rumours, potential lies and deceipts.

Everything But The Girl (EBTG) sang when alls well

When the grief burst in.   Always a suprise.   Always dramatic.    Tracey, alone with her guitar  sang  New Opened Eyes

the bells
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inappropriate

Monday, April 6th, 2009 | tags: , , ,  |

In 1984 I fell in luuurrrrrrve,   surruptiticously,   with such stealth that I didn’t notice.   For the first six months   I couldn’t understand a word he said with his northern near-Geordie  brogue.   The oscillations of his intonation, arms, facial expressions and dangly earings together told fascianting stories without the need for the precision, or ambiguity, of actual words.   We relied on songs and dancing  to communicate.  During our early courtship he would wrap-up his DJ shifts by  playing this song  for us

Lloyd Cole and the Commotions sang Perfect Skin

inappropriate
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of mice and maturing

Sunday, April 30th, 2006 | tags: , , , , , ,  |

1985 (Assume poetic licence  with the precision of dates and details.   The story has  changed with  fermentation in memory.   The gist of the story is consistent with the orginal experience.)

I   rented a room near ‘The Mermaid’ in a small  Sparkhill red-brick terraced house shared with four girls.   Bambi rented a room  in a Handsworth  red brick terraced house  shared with four boys.   Two bus rides, an hour, apart.   Neither house had a telephone.   We were poor.   We were young.

Bambi’s house smelt of rotting mice.   It was infested.  The neighbours houses were infested.   The whole area was infested.   Everyone lived with the mice.  Mice would dash for cover when you entered a room, switched on a light, moved suddenly.   The boys would play at trying to jump on, squash,  mice before they reached cover.   Several  squashed mice decorated the floor in the front room.   The floor was also decorated with chair-side piles of empty beer cans and chris-crossed with glittering slug trails.    A milk bottle containing a dead mouse sat on the fireplace mantle; gently warmed by the gas fire on colder days.   The mouse had climbed in voluntarily when the bottle lay on the floor then, unable to climb out,  starved to death.   The boys treated  the bottled mouse  as a trophy.   Some mice died more peacefully of old age under the floor boards.   Then rotted.   I’ll never forget the overwhelming stench of rotting mouse.   It’s integrally bound with first love.  It filled your lungs and scented your sweat during the deep breaths of love making.   It seems appropriate that I read Ian McEwan’s “First Love, Last Rites” in this house.  

Early on a brightly lit  summer evening I turned-up to meet  Bambi.   He wasn’t in.  In other homes I would make myself at home with a cup of Tea.   Not here. Concerns about household hygiene.   The mice-droppings on the kitchen work surfaces and stench were an effective deterrent to eating or drinking.   I picked a book from Bambi’s collection and  opened a window in a futile attempt to release the seemingly endless odour.   With my head by the open window I  started to read ‘the catcher in the rye.    My first American novel.   The sun gradually set.   Sodium pink, then yellow, street lights lit the pages.    The mice scuttled over the silence.   Lost in the story I forgot about the planned evening with Bambi.    Despite knowing  very little about the places,  symbols,  or lifestyle outlined in the book it felt powerfully relevant to  the loneliness of that night, madness of  youth,  and pains of new found adulthood.  

I finished the novel as Bambi arrived.

of mice and maturing
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