scribbles tagged ‘bus’

Happy number: 44

Wednesday, November 7th, 2007 | tags: , ,  |

Its my birthday.

It’s Eyan & Phil’s birthday.

It’s international Jennifer day

I’m 44 (and British)

The wikipedia entry for 44 points out that despite not being a prime number it is one of an elite 12% of numbers that can be described as  a ‘Happy Number’.

44 trivia:

  • Its the international dialing number for the UK and that’s where I am today,   in Reading, in the UK, and that’s where I come from and I’m a citizen not an alien.    
  • A bus, big caravan,  production company in Germany.   I like buses.
  • 44 was a leap year starting on Wednesday.   During this year Emporer Claudius returned from a campaign in,   yes you’ve guessed it, Britain!
  • Psalm 44 is powerfully emotive,   excerts of the language within the psalm:  ‘crushing people’,   ‘trampling our foes’, ‘scorn and derision’, ‘reproach and revile me’, ‘crushed us and made us a haunt for jackals’.   It is a bid to the christian God for support in torrid times.   Probably a bit more torrid than my current repatriation expereince*  but in that sort of direction on the scale that ranges from comatosed to extreme torridity.

* I did phone someone up yesterday to tell them I was frustrated,   so that is pretty torrid on the Wendy torridity scales.   I used the word frustrated 4 times,   then had a cup of tea to calm down.   I feel a bit bad now about that impulsive outburst of saying I’m frustrated.    

Happy number: 44
rate wendys scribble

3 bits of fabulous banter »

repatriating to Reading (Berkshire) UK

Wednesday, October 31st, 2007 | tags: , , , , , ,  |

Reading rhymes with

I’ll be covering the unique and much maligned experience that is ‘Reading’ in many upcoming blog posts.    A Brighton-based blog post exemplifies  common themes of passionate disappointment in Reading:

the epicentre of new Labour, corporate, consumerist blandness…     …despite its affluence and its growing population it can’t rise above the terminal blandness and ‘middle Englandness’ it seems to have always had…       …It is bored and dissatisfied young people planning their escape, it’s a football club who plays in a shed resembling an out of town B&Q and whose torrid home games with their dire atmosphere are (ahem) bound to take the Premiership by storm this season…   …Reading is a rip off, Reading is unfriendly, Reading is in a rush to purchase and then to get home.

Oh deary me!

A (fictional) letter from “chase me ladies I’m in the cavalry” to a Reading East MP (Member for Parliament) had me wetting my pants,   or is it my trousers,   I can’t be sure,   but they are definitely damp.

There is good news about Reading provided by a blog called Reading Roars.  Not  ‘Reading belches’ ,   ‘Reading  pukes’,  ‘Reading falls asleep in front of the TV’.   Wendy appetite wetting references includes a Sushi restaurant.   yes,  one!   Wireless enabled bus service called the “Thames Valley Park” (TVP)  that has been described as a  ‘farce‘.    I love a good farce.    I do like buses too.    Two goodies in one!    I can hardly wait to try blogging from a bus.   Just imagine what a vibrating bus will do to my spelling, ability to fall-over, and general happiness…    There’s a Farmers market.   I do like farmers and I might find  one or two ruddy  faced farmers there. With my UK  regional accent I might even be mistaken for a farmer,   it has happened before!

Result!          

Stay tuned to find out how my Reading investigations evolve,   or even send me tips on highlights…

repatriating to Reading (Berkshire) UK
rate wendys scribble

5 bits of fabulous banter »

Lithuania to Limerick

Monday, September 24th, 2007 | tags: ,  |

My first impression of Limerick is that it has welcomed many people from eastern European communities.

After a red-eye flight covering 24hrs Wendy-time I  look more than a touch bedraggled and every bit my 43yrs.

Wendy:   what choices do I have to get from here to Limerick?

Shannon Airport Information:   Bus or taxi,   do you have much luggage?

Wendy:   Just this

Airport Information:   take the bus.

This is the kind of advice that I like to hear.

At the bus stop two young girls wearing heavy dark eye-liner shelter from the drizzle by me.    They chainsmoke wearing airport badges with their long hair pulled away from their faces.    The original colour of their hair is showing for 2 inches at the roots.   White-skinned   blonded brunettes talking with  an urgency normally utilised by  drug addicts  or excited children they look slightly bedraggled too.    They are not talking English or Irish,   they sound eastern European.    

A couple looking over 50yrs wearing well-ironed bright clothes stand either side of numerous new-looking suitcases.   In an US accent the lady asks me   Is it daylight savings time in Ireland?  In my English accent I reply   I have no idea.   It is 7.50am

The girls stop talking,   their cigarettes held close,   but not  touching their lips.   They look at the US couple and me  for a few seconds then resume their chatter.  

When collecting my fare the bus driver scowels at me.    Here  my accent is definitely not cute it is that of a recent  occupier and oppressor.   During its route the bus (30mins,   €5.70) picks up about 10 people.   Judging by their accents and language about half of them are eastern European.   On the  journey, inbetween  talking calmly,  slowly, continually,  into an earmounted phone headset,  the driver shouts obscenities at other drivers “Ya Prick!” in an Irish accent  .  

Later downtown I find several shops that specialise in Lithuanian and Polish foods,   as I walk passed queues at the downtown bus-stops I hear eastern European accents mixed with the the Irish.   The two receptionists, half the bar staff and  all the restaurant wait staff  in the Hotel sound eastern European….    

Lithuania to Limerick
rate wendys scribble

1 wonderful musing »

Visiting time at the BRI, 1968

Saturday, June 9th, 2007 | tags: , , , , , , ,  |

Mumsie packed older brother (9yrs) and I  (5yrs) on a public bus for a 40min bus ride to the Marlborough St. City centre bus terminal.  

Exciting.   Adventure.   Upstairs on a double-decker bus without any adults.   Going to the big city.   Bother held my hand as we left the bus.   We walked up the hill towards the   Bristol Royal Infirmary.  I knew the way because I came on the Bus with Mumsie every Thursday when she came to the city to shop.  

Crossing the road,   very scary.   Mumzie always held my hand,  checked for traffic.   I didn’t know how to cross the road.   I still find it particularly tricky.   I held my brothers hand tightly, walked fast and close to him as we crossed the road.   Once in the hospital I had no idea where to go.    My brother read the signs and found my other brother (6yrs) in the childrens ward,    who promptly started crying.  

What a wuss.   Here in this interesting big hospital with lots of fabulous toys and other children to play with and all he does is sit in bed  crying!   I wandered off to play with the other children and big toys.     One of the children  was bald.    Some wacky children in here.   Then dad turned up and we left crying brother in the hospital,   crying even more now.   We rode  home in Dads pale blue Ford Corsair car.    I was allowed to  sit in the front seat because Mumzie wasn’t  there.  

All in all   a fabulous adventure.

Visiting time at the BRI, 1968
rate wendys scribble

what do you think of that »

(dis)respect

Sunday, June 3rd, 2007 | tags:  |

the popularity of Bay 1 cannot be underestimated.   The bus was completely full.   A caucasian gentleman with silver hair was standing in the isle next to me.    Respectfully, I offered him my seat

silver haired gent:   “I hope I don’t look that incapable

Apparantly you insult an senior gent when you offer him a seat.   Or rather I did.  I looked at the women on the other side of the isle from me,   an elderly lady,   then created a plausible fiction:

wendy: “you look very healthy,   I thought you were with this lady and would want to sit where you could talk to her”    

The gent didn’t acknowledge my creative fiction.  

silver haired gent:   “I must be looking pale today

I looked at him,   his skin was transluscent by ethnicity more than by age,   he was truely pale-skinned.   I smiled embarrressedly and regretted having offered my seat,   I seemed to have offended him.    

Should I make a capability assessment before offering my seat in the US?

(dis)respect
rate wendys scribble

1 wonderful musing »

Redmond Park & Ride Bay 1

Sunday, January 21st, 2007 | tags: , ,  |

Bay 1 is popular!   Why?

  1. children arriving and leaving with their skateboards for the nearby park.
  2. there are 377 car parking spaces across the road by the only other bay,   Bay 2.  
  3. frequent, cheap, fast, buses to downtown Seattle.
  4. buses have bicycle carriers (Redmond is rumoured to be the Bicycle capital of the NW USA).
  5. Redmond Library,   Police Station, Courts and shopping facilities are within 3 blocks.
  6. the outrageously innovative, wild, humerous naming strategy used for this Park and Ride.   I fell off my chair laughing.   I’m going to write a poem about it.   Really.   I am.   I AM.  

Bay 1 doesn’t have a  fancy  ‘Robobus’.   It does have an open-fronted   wind-rain shelter painted brightly with pictures that look like a cross-between graffiti and children’s pictures that might be posted on a Fridge.     The quick, cheap, warm, friendly ride on the 545x to downtown Seattle is simply adorable.   It costs less than downtown parking!   The bus drivers are cheerful helpful people.   Wonderful service.

Actually,   I go there  to hang-out at Bay 1.  

I  like  riding on  buses

Redmond Park & Ride Bay 1
rate wendys scribble

what do you think of that »

sea belongings

Friday, July 28th, 2006 | tags:  |

In the Wendy House,   road-trip excitements builds.    The first stage Greyhound ticket has arrived.    I have one outrageously oversized suitcase  that can carry my tent,  roll matt, sleeping bag, clothes for the week, wash kit and possibly even Flat Eric!  All this is only half the check-in luggage for either bus or plane!  

The ‘C’ belongings  will be  hand luggage: computer, casio camera, cell-phone, chargers,  connection cables, cash and cards….

Greyhound ticket

(this picture was taken with the retiring  fuzzy  Canon)

sea belongings
rate wendys scribble

what do you think of that »

Leyland Olympian

Thursday, July 6th, 2006 | tags: , , ,  |

I saw a Leyland doubledecker  bus in Seattle.  Whooopie!!!

Instant over-excitement.  

I shouldn’t read the branding on bus-grills while driving.   It’s one of my naughty habits.   I think it was a Leyland “Olympian“.   An Olympian bus with views of the Olympic mountains imported from Britain built by the British National motor  industry with engineering specialism from Bristol.  

I’m getting all soppy again.     Time for more Tea.

Leyland Olympian
rate wendys scribble

what do you think of that »

Modern Double-deckers

Wednesday, June 7th, 2006 | tags:  |

11C

Originally uploaded by Pete Ashton.


Bored of buses yet?
Not me!
Just look at this flash fancy new bus that runs on the 11 c route now. I want a go!

Modern Double-deckers
rate wendys scribble

what do you think of that »

View from top of a double decker bus

Tuesday, June 6th, 2006 | tags: ,  |

Bored Now
Originally uploaded by Pete Ashton.

sat above the driver of an 11c bus, with your feet on the sill, heaven! I’m easily pleased

View from top of a double decker bus
rate wendys scribble

what do you think of that »

first geek experience

Monday, June 5th, 2006 | tags: , ,  |

11 in Yardley 1

Originally uploaded by BrilliantMistake.

 

Note: this is a repost of a deleted post where the formatting totally f*******-up my whole blog lay-out. Apologies to people with RSS feed who saw all my attempts to correct the formating.   You’ll have to squint to read the  paragraphs because using copy and paste for the repost hasn’t worked,   I can’t work out how to get back to the default font size for this post

My first experience of ‘geekism’ was meeting ‘Transport Management’ students at the Univeristy of Aston in Birmingham. One student had wall-papered his room with the Birmingham bus schedule.   He had a telescope that he used to check whether the buses were running on time. Another had his room full of blown-up photographs of the aeroplane’s that he had flown on. I went on a day trip with three of them to Stratford upon Avon train station. We never left the train station.   We wandered around photographing the trains. One lad went on to become an Air Traffic Controller.   Another lad drives armoured gold bullion vans.   His quirk was kissing cars, he would kiss any beautiful car he saw. Once on a very cold day he left the  skin of his lips on a red Porche. Transport students were strange, very happy, individuals. Their enthusiasm was infectious.   From them I developed the skill to love the  circular, octagonal, windy 11c Birmingham city bus route. The Transport students  understood. They lived in the house with mice.   They didn’t mind because their love of  Transport seemed to fill their hearts blinding them to many, personally  insignificant,  details of social conformity.   In the picture above the 11c bus route is portrayed as an oblong with gently curved corners.

Can you feel the love?

Shall I go back into my hole now or later?

first geek experience
rate wendys scribble

what do you think of that »

Here comes the 11c!

Thursday, May 18th, 2006 | tags:  |

 
Watford Road
Originally uploaded by Pete Ashton.

some of the guys on flick-r are pulling together photographs of the 11c bus route. this is a picture of one of the ‘hilly’ bits. Notice how small the cars are compared to NW US cars. Riding above the driver on these buses can be pretty hairy! No need for a roller coaster ride when you’ve got an 11c….  

The  church spire in the background is  another common sight.

Here comes the 11c!
rate wendys scribble

what do you think of that »

outer circle

Thursday, May 4th, 2006 | tags: , , , ,  |

1986

Unlimited travel, freedom printed on my West Midlands Travel  pass.   Buses, seven days a week, 24 hours a day.   Trains too!   No more planning my journeys by cost or parental good will.  No-one I knew could afford a car.   Riding Double Decker buses above the driver with views across the city and into first-floor rooms of street lining houses.   Everything is on show through those windows: loneliness; lovemaking; waiting; TV watching; eating;  arguments; cats watching me watching them.

Sunday riding  the “outer circle”, route 11.   A circle by name,   squished octagonal by map, and  voluptuous curvacious rolling ride by road.   Either way if you keep going long enough  you  end up right back where you started.   The route  is strewn with churches, graveyards, suburbs, slums, shopping streets,   industrial ‘parks’ and other passengers.    A couple made love on the back seat of the upper deck.     When they noticed me noticing them we all giggled.   I respected their location choice because its warm, dry, relatively private,  and best of all it lacks  the scent of rotting mice

West Midlands Transit Map - SQUINT!

2006

Commuters reading books.    A lady explains to her phone  how to treat dry skin then takes its  advice on using a  tea-bag to treat a sore eye.   Everyone looked busy,   except me.    Passengers  in another part of Seattle could make a very different impression.    I wanted to ride the buses ’til the sun had long set and  the buses carried me home,  tired and sated.     But

My stop.      Temporarily mislaid freedom.

Maybe Sunday….

outer circle
rate wendys scribble

2 bits of fabulous banter »