scribbles tagged ‘Reading town’

retrospectively great expectations

Sunday, August 21st, 2011 | tags: , ,  |

Great Expectation (London St)In its short lifetime of 169 years, 33 London street has hosted diverse cultural activities – institute, theatre, church then pub

Local authoress Ms Mary Russell Mitford laid the foundation stone of the “New Hall” in 1842. Contemporary writing refers to the New Hall as either the “Literary, Scientific and Mechanics Institute” or the “Theatre Royal”.  The Institute appears to be part of a social movement that started in Wales to ensure adults of all classes, probably men, had the opportunity to learn about the arts and sciences. It provided a place they could go that had useful stuff like a library and events, for example plays

At the building’s opening in 1843 Charles Dickens read from his work. Some sources say he read from “Great Expectations” and others “Pickwick papers”

The building is later refered to as “The primitive methodist chapel” I wasn’t able to find clear, confirmed dates for this, or a reason why the Institute moved out of the building

Now it’s a public house and hotel named after the Dickens’ book  “Great Expectations”. The ground floor of the pub still has a library room

retrospectively great expectations
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Reading town’s friendly societies

Monday, August 15th, 2011 | tags: , ,  |

Rummaging around in the history of Reading town one theme keeps cropping-up, Friendly societies, Societies of Friends (Quakers), and their contribution to the quality of life of local citizens. Here’ s an example from the History of Unison website:

By the 1630’s weavers, many of them refugees from Catholic France, were leaving London in search of work and coming to Reading. This was part of the early system of organised labour based on the principle of the search for work being sustained by fellow craftsmen who gradually organised themselves into ‘Friendly Societies.’ In 1841 the Friendly Society of Iron Moulders, with twenty-two members in Reading, gave assistance to 275 ‘tramps,’ (see note 1.) By 1847 these twenty-two men had, themselves, been forced to go in search of work but their branch, kept in being by the landlord of their public house, enabled 1038 members of the union to be given relief as they ‘trampled through the town.’….

Cemetery Junction Coop…From early meetings of supporters of Robert Owen, the Co-operative Movement was established in Reading, the first shop at 14 Caversham Road being opened soon after the formation of the society in 1860. Not only shops but a diary, bakery, jam factory, printing works, nursery, and even a footwear repairing factory, made the Reading Co-operative Society one of the best organised and strongest in Britain…

…in the area of music and drama the Labour movement also made a contribution. In the mid-nineteen thirties the Workers Drama Association was established with a performance of ‘The Six Men Of Dorset’ a play about the Tolpuddle Martyrs. Today the W.D.A. has become the Progress Theatre

Reading town’s friendly societies
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Movements

Monday, July 25th, 2011 | tags: , , ,  |

oh!

I’ve joined a group, a society, a community a Movement!

Berkshire Womens Movement (BWM)

I like to pronounce it as BRRrrrrrrrwwwm, like the sound of a car accelerating. I’m hoping for some community action. Yay! The second incarnation of the Brrrrvrrrrooom website says the movement is all about

bringing about social change through community inclusion

The driving, founding member has already arranged a discussion group lead by one of the UK’s leading feminists, a celebrity – Kat Banyard author of ‘The Equality Illusion‘ and director of UKFeminista

She’ll be leading a discussion on…

‘Why is feminism still relevant today?’
Wednesday 27th July 2011
7pm – 9pm @ RISC Global Cafe, 35-39 London Street, Reading, Berkshire, RG1 4PS.

Meanwhile, I’ll get to wear one of those little plastic-coated paper broaches  that says “BWM wendy” excellent!
Come along and join in…

Movements
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no recent strategy

Thursday, July 7th, 2011 | tags: ,  |

Recent PublicationsUK universities participate in 2 quality assessment exercises, one for research quality and one for teaching quality. Research quality is primarily assessed by staff publications, the top 4 publications of each staff member.

Reading University Agricultural department proudly displays it’s recent strategy publications on a cork-board with a box attached to hold the overflow.

A disturbing lack of recent strategy…..

no recent strategy
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time-boxed enterpise

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 | tags: , ,  |

Visitor ParkingVisitors to the Enterprise centre can only park for 20 mins

20 minutes is their time-box

time-box is trendy business language

Is this a cunning prompt for enterprising visitors to think out of their (time) box to either

find ways to stay longer than 20 minutes

or

do what normally takes more than 20 minutes in less time

time-boxed enterpise
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Fine art map

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011 | tags: , , , ,  |

Fine Art Map LostReading University fine art degree show 2011

Tucked behind a filing cabinet in the corridor, a departmental sign proclaimed “Fine art map”

The map didn’t embody my understanding of ‘fine art’. The skills and interests of departmental academic staff don’t emerge in this creation for public consumption. The title ‘Lost’ was apt not just geographically, but with the pieces displayed in the show. Final pieces were planted without context, no comment on the artists inspiration or journey. This often left me feeling lost and wishing the artists had put more effort into engaging me. Afterall, I am here as a willing participant

Each piece was labelled with a title, the name of the artist, their course. Some large paintings of nude women were labelled “nudes”. Indeed, the title did convey the content in a stripped to the bare essentials way – like the paintings

I managed to find fun in some pieces. Especially when the artist had planned them to engage with action aswell as thought:

  • running through a waterfall
  • putting a post-it note to my friends in Seattle on a map of the world

I kept getting distracted from the show by the wonderful language of the building and social structure. Then labelled-stickytape, provided by one artist, kindly drew me back to the thoughtful work of the students in the building

potentiality

Fine art map
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green doors

Saturday, June 18th, 2011 | tags: , , , , ,  |

The toilets in the Fine Art department of Reading University are proudly green and probably original features of the one-storey utilitarian style brick building (circa 1930). The subtle differences in styling such as the 3 vertical panels on the womens’ door imply it may be newer (circa 1950) than the more utilitarian design of the mens’.

womenThe addition of a paper sign to the womens’ door is a modern addition, an attempt to change behaviour using strong language “Important, Under no circumstances should…” clear identification  of the people who should attend to this notice “...fine arts students…” and their unacceptable behaviour “…clean their brushes in these toilets

EWE!  I always use the sink to clean my brushes – easier and less whiffy.

green door

green doors
1 vote rating 2

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whats on TV?

Sunday, June 12th, 2011 | tags: , ,  |

what's on TV today?A loud-mouthed moorhen*  Coot was on TV in the River Kennet today. The bird had a lot to say.

TV is a good medium for riding your message to the masses.  This TV has a chameleon nature, colours matching the bird and the river.

I suspect the moorhen Coot was announcing that this TV has beeen adopted as high-quality nesting material.

* Correction suggested by AFH in the comments

whats on TV?
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wendy’s occupying the house

Friday, June 10th, 2011 | tags: , ,  |

As we walk into the 1930’s building that houses the Reading Fine Arts degree show we are passed a clip-board with a pen attached on a long string. The

Building Occupants Register

A dedicated labelled plynth proudly holds the list of visitors on a smartly painted brick wall above what was once a modern radiator.

As I leave the building I wonder whether my name should be struck from the list. I’m no longer an occupant. Where does visiting end and occupancy begin? For a firefighter, tackling a blaze, “who’s in the building?” is the key question. A partailly accurate paper list will not help them.

Building Occupants Register

wendy’s occupying the house
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thumbs away

Monday, June 6th, 2011 | tags: , , , , ,  |

First Great Western train commuteRiding the 6.45pm First Great Western fast commuter train, peak time, from London Paddington to some exotic location in the west. Standing room only, though some people are sat on the floor in the isles. I choose a place where fresh air can shift the almost rank stench of warm and stale sweat.

I lean against the toilet door.

Surrounded by besuited men with unimaginative ties and gently bulging stomachs. They all wear identically styled black leather shoes that are only differentiated by the size and degree of wear. I run my gaze up their bodies, risking eye-contact. No, not risking eye-contact because they are all immersed in their phones, silently thumbing their importance to others.

No fear of eye-contact, even though I’m the only woman present and dressed in bright-blue with flat shoes conforming to neither girliness, motherliness, nor business attire. I am invisible.

The new factory workers are crammed onto this train like chickens in a battery coup. I thank an undefined diety or two that I am not, and may never be, a conformist – no matter how painful noncomformity can be.

thumbs away
1 vote rating 3

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look up there

Friday, May 27th, 2011 | tags: ,  |

lamp post sculpture look up there, an airplane trail!

At first I was baffled by my aunties enthusiasm for seeing an airplane vapour trail. She sounded like an excited child. Like me when I was younger. Either side of the vapour trail was a fabulous blue sky, I marvelled at its beauty. Something I’d fogotten. Hull has captured the clear blue skies of my childhood.

The skies around my home in Reading town are wrapped in the string of multiple vapour trails from international planes. Only Icelandic Volcano’s clear them.

look up there
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can you improve cemetery junction?

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011 | tags: , , , , , ,  |

A4 going east approaching Cemetery JunctionCan you improve Cemetery Junction?

Is it so gorgeous that any changes are more likely to ruin its existing gorgeousity?

Is it so icky that people have given up hope of being able to improve it without first obliterating it?

The question raises all sorts of emotionally charged, creative, cynical, optimistic, pragmatic and other reactions from people who live near, or pass through, the infamous local junction of the A4 (London Road) and A329 (Kings/Wokingham Road).

A local councilor, Rob White, is working with local action groups to improve the Cemetery Junction area. At the moment he’s consulting with locals. The co-op has a big cardboard suggestions box decorated with a collage of magazine pictures of pretty things. Excellent stuff. It made me feel like being back at school where having a go was important, encouraged and easy.

I’m loving the humour and creativity evident in this summary of suggestions to improve cemetery junction made on a ‘Get Reading’ news article:

  • i’m thinking giant dinosaurs
  • how about a cinema or a roller disco?
  • Napalm
  • Make it a spooky theme park
  • How about a monorail?
  • A small tactical thermo-nuclear device
  • Bit of paint and a clean should do it….or if you really wanna prettify it, hanging baskets
  • An underpass
  • make a big roundabout where resturant is
  • Nuke the site from orbit. It’s the only way to be sure
  • re-install the gallows that used to stand on the site now occupied by The Granby? It might act as a deterrent to the hoodies and wannbie gangsters in that area
  • What about an H Bomb?
  • Prevent shop keepers and traders from parking cars and vans on the pavements
  • The overhanging bushes on the London Rd side need trimming… …new paving and signage
  • can’t be improved – its a dead loss
  • A Tesco supermarket each side of the road, with a couple of Tesco Expresses sprinkled around Liverpool and Cholmeley Roads
  • big ornamental archway would brighten up the area considerably
  • Give me some explosives and a bulldozer and Ill give you instant results. Guaranteed
  • Zombie Apocalypse
can you improve cemetery junction?
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Reading books for free

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011 | tags: , ,  |

Books for freeWandering through downtown Reading I often stumble across pleasant surprises.

This is one of those lovely surprises – free books offered from an ostentatious doorway as part of a Healthy planet initiaitive.

Topical that Reading provides free books!

Reading books for free
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Viking jeans

Sunday, May 8th, 2011 | tags: , , , , ,  |

Bux raised my awareness of discarding clothing as street art in everyday Oslo with a string of spectacular posts.

English people also discard their clothes in public, displayed in artistic ways at eye level. Below we see a pink shoe awaiting a push button signal before hot footing it to the Tandoori across the road.
lone shoe crossing

Viking jeans
1 vote rating 5

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check your pocket contents

Saturday, May 7th, 2011 | tags: , , , ,  |

Our correspondent from Barcelona recently provided this little tid-bit:

Most modern English place names have their origins in Old English, the Anglo-Saxon language; most of the other contributions are either oddities or window dressing. Recurring elements that help us to do our own detective work include the endings “-ham” and “-ton“, ancestors of “home” and “town“; Hampton is a combination of the two and Hampstead means, more or less, “homestead“. The “-ing” generally means a place was founded by the followers of a certain chieftain: Reading is called after an otherwise forgotten man, Reada, whose name suggests that he had red hair, and Hastings after Haesta, who was probably quick-tempered.

thatched pub and post van

check your pocket contents
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free tranquility

Saturday, April 23rd, 2011 | tags: ,  |

Bluebell borderReading town is not reknowned for its beauty. Internet research before I first visited provided a rather scathing description of the town as a place that is near other places worth visiting like London, Oxford, Windsor, Stone Henge. A commuter town that people only visited to sleep or shop in the mall resourced with most major chain outlets in a riverside setting.

The descriptions didn’t tweak my aspiration to live in a cute city with a rich history, diverse and vibrant entertainment opportunities. This photograph was taken at 10am in Forbury gardens in Reading town.  Whatever the season the gardens are cared for and visited. They are so beautiful. I walk through them to soak up the free tranquility and social vibes whenever I’m walking to the train station (often) or downtown. Like a village, locals use the gardens to sunbathe and play games, I bump into people that I know. Unlike a village the gardens host many, diverse, events. Bands play in a band-stand, it hosts art shows and charity fund raisers. Reading parks are wonderful. They are a good reason to live in the town.

Reading has 3 major parks – Palmer’s Park, Prospect Park and Forbury gardens. Each plays a slightly different role.

  • Palmers park -tennis, soccer, cycling, jogging, cricket, children’s playground. SPORT.
  • Prospect park – nature rambles, picknicks, jogging, dog walking, snooping on wildlife, steam train appreciation
  • Forbury gardens– concerts, sunbathing, break from shopping, picnic, watching the world go by, history lesson, plant appreciation

Drop by and check it for yourselves, for me its a special place for tranquilty and community

free tranquility
1 vote rating 5

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Diesel Particle Filter Malfunction (part 3)

Thursday, April 14th, 2011 | tags: , , , , , ,  |

Thomas alone in the Carparkwendy:  when I bring Thomas in for his new tyres I’d like you to upgrade the software aswell – but I don’t think I should pay for the software update

Service engineer: (disarming giggles) Good luck! You’re booked in

Diesel Particle Filter Malfunction (part 3)
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Diesel Particle Filter Malfunction (part 2)

Tuesday, April 12th, 2011 | tags: , , , , , ,  |

ParkedDuring Thomas’ annual service the battery was disconnected forcing his onboard computer to reboot. After reboot the Diesel Particle Filter malfunction warning still showed.

The mechanic said the filter looked ok. The nice chap at the Mini Dealership explained that the software might be malfunctioning and would cost me £90 to upgrade.

£90 for a software update!

What?! Software malfunctioning? Software not doing what it was designed to do? That sounds like a programming bug to me, a design fault. Software doesn’t suffer from ‘wear and tear’ like mechanical components. It sounds like Mini manufacturers, BMW, are passing on the cost of fixing their poor original workmanship to their customers! Atrocious. Most software providers release free fixes for software bugs. Hmmmmm…..

An internet search suggested that driving above 40 mph consistently for 10 minutes on a regular basis should burn-off the diesel particles and remove any mechanical problem – if one actually exists. There were lots of discussion forums talking about the warning light showing when there was no malfuntion on BMW cars. Consistent with an actual software design fault.

I changed my driving pattern to include regular periods of driving over 40mph for 10 minutes. Bye Bye to beautiful back-road Oxfordshire. The warning sign still showed. Sigh.

Time to re-visit those lovely chaps at MiniCooper Reading…

Diesel Particle Filter Malfunction (part 2)
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cheese with friends

Saturday, March 12th, 2011 | tags: , , ,  |

Carr-Taylor VineyardAround 400 vineyards produce wine in England

Driving the back roads from Dungeness to Reading I stumbled across the Carr-Taylor vinyard and spent a good morning in the sunshine with the staff and chipper terriers. We wandered around the Vinyard, sat and tasted wines at long tables in the wineshop, talked about the history and workings of their business. They made me feel like a special guest more than a tourist and shopper. They mainly sell wine through local stores because they can’t produce sufficient quantities to supply supermarket chains.

English vineyards produce high quality white wines, meads and champagnes.

English WineIt was good fun choosing different wines to bring home as gifts for different people,  Prune wine for my brother’s birthday, Elderberry wine for mother’s day, Ginger wine for cheese with friends…

This spirng I’ll be visiting the vineyard near Reading town, it has a beautiful chataeu – Stanlake Park

cheese with friends
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Finnish flag

Saturday, February 26th, 2011 | tags: , , , ,  |

Wendy: I’d like a Finnish Flag decal for the roof of my Mini

Mini Salesboy: Sure, a checkered flag

Wendy: No, the country Finland, the country’s flag, a blue cross on a white background

We laughed and he gave me the name and phone number of the company the local Mini outlet uses for all their custom work. The staff at the local Mini outlet in Reading town always manage to make me feel good, even on the rare occassions they actually take some of my cash

Finnish flag
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the winning read is set in Reading!

Sunday, February 20th, 2011 | tags: ,  |

I found it difficult to vote for any book that I’d read. This took Wuthering Heights and Gormenghast out of the running.  It left me feeling guilty of unfairly overlooking excellent classics in favour of unknown novelty

Scepticism stopped me seeing virtues in books by authors whose other work I’d not enjoyed. This meant Bill Bryson’s ‘A walk in the woods‘ was starting with a handicap that Sarah’s description failed to overcome. This left me feeling guilty of expecting the authors style to not evolve in inspirational ways

In one case I’d read excellent books by this author, but not this book. This gave The fourth bear by Jasper Fforde an immediate advantage. This also left me feeling guilty of expecting continued excellence from Mr Fforde

Tina told a really engaging story about her book. She described her experience of reading it and the tequniques the author used that engaged her. It was intriguing and inspiring. Because Tina did such a good job of selling a book by an author I didn’t know, this book got my vote – Eucalyptus by Murray Bail

The book that most people voted for was:

The fourth bear by Jasper Fforde

It’s set in Reading town! It’s a follow-on from the egg-cellent ‘The Big Over Easy“.   I’ll be reading it while taking counselling to overcome my growing guilt complex

the winning read is set in Reading!
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Read dating people

Saturday, February 19th, 2011 | tags: , , , , , , ,  |

The evening started with a £3 fee, a sticky name-tag, an empty-crib-sheet for notes, two opposing rows of 10 chairs, and a glass of wine. The organiser, Laura, recognised me by my bookMervyn Peake’sLetters from a lost uncle

Soon the evening was buzzing with quick animated talk as we used our 2 minute timed slots to promote our favourite book to each other. 20 people, each with 2 minutes to entice another person to read their favourite book. At the end of the 40 minutes we all voted for the book we liked-best.

A fascinating cross section of books, people and Library staff. All personable, quirky and good natured. And me. Organising this diverse collection of literary enthusiasts is a challenge. The Reading Central library team failed with flare and  improvised with charming grace.

For people that want a novel introduction to a range of books, to meet local people, and have a good swig of wine thrown in, this is an excellent event.

4 smiles: Ratings explained

Read Dating crib sheet

Two minute book promotion techniques varied from reading 4 pages of bulleted notes on a book I’d been given as an 18th birthday present, read, and loved (Lynne’s Gormenghast trilogy) to Marie Claire’s brief, almost self-apologetic, statement ‘Its like a soap opera, its about people‘ (Men from the boys by Tony Parsons).

Adam produced a polished, yet souless, advocation of Wuthering Heights. If I hadn’t already read the book his persepctive ofnHeathcliffe as misunderstood by the general reading public would have put me off reading it. Adam had no sense of tailoring his delivery to the audience, to me. His delivery felt cold, dispassionate.

Arathy bought the book that had changed her life ‘The science of self realisation‘ by his divine grace Srila Prabhupada. Ernestly she showed me chapter headings and managed to talk in a way that I found difficult to follow. I tried asking her questions about how it had changed her life but she didn’t manage to give me an insight into her revelations, her life before and her life after the change. I was pleased for her discovery but not persuaded that this book would engage me.

During a mid-session break I uncovered snippits of these people’s lives, an emigrant from Australia, an unemployed teenager from Henley-on-Thames, and a mother who’s children had recently left home learning German to fill the gap. No-one asked about me. Even in the midst of lively conversations my ability to feel invisible seeps in.

Read dating people
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Read dating in Reading

Friday, February 18th, 2011 | tags: , , ,  |

It’s not dating, I’m sorry

Laura seemed concerned that I might have misunderstood the Central Library’s Read Dating event

That’s ok, I like how inclusive it is – you don’t have to be single to take part, anyone who has a book they love can join in, that’s great!

Unfortunately they hadn’t received my online sign-up and now the popular event was fully booked. I’d been excluded. Laura was very apologetic.

Can you put me on a waiting list incase someone drops out?

Laura explained that people just fail to turn up on the night, they never let her know first. Sadly, I thanked Laura for taking the time to be so helpful then checked that she had my phone number just incase. Disappointed at missing what sounded like a good evening out:

Read dating, like speed dating but with literary attitude!  Reading Library presents a fun and friendly evening where you can share you reading passions with like-minded people.
Come ready to enthuse about your favourite read 1:1. You will have just a couple of minutes to woo readers to your book. Prize for the reader whose book scores the most “dates”.

Later that evening Laura called

Cinderalla you shall go to the ball (Library)!

Actually she said

I’ve phoned round everyone that signed up and found a person that can’t come, so there is a place for you. Can I take your library card number?

Wonderful personal service! Laura asked if I had any idea what book I would be bringing. With no hesitation I blurted out

Mervyn Peake’s – letters from a lost uncle

Reading Library staff’s humanity  humility and imagination – you can get some without a prescription, it’s FREE!

Read dating in Reading
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slight side-step

Thursday, February 17th, 2011 | tags: , ,  |

Kennet at nightA schoolboy sidesteps into a shop entranceway so that my path isn’t interrupted as I bruskly walk along King’s street towards the Reading train station. I had planned to step sideways, to let him amble on without interruption. His proactive gesture of consideration was a very warm untouch in this cold morning.

I smiled down towards my elbow, at his small uniformed frame, saying thankyou in the cheeriest voice I could muster. He didn’t look up to acknowledge my pleased surprise and gratitude. As if adults are obstacles to be manoeuvred-around, not heard.

This seemingly natural, unselfconscious, movement made my day. A million other small good things happened that day, but his slight side-step is a lasting highlight.

slight side-step
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leading

Thursday, February 3rd, 2011 | tags: , ,  |

The BladeA persistent challenge for people that use search engines to look for things in Reading (Berks, UK) is that the search engines don’t even try to differentiate between Reading the place and reading the activity. Consequently, any search results contain lots of obviously irrelevant results that are about reading (rhymes with feeding). The human searcher has to skim read all of the contents to mentally filter-out the irrelevant results.

To help reduce the irrelevant reading (rhymes with needing) search results I normally include the local county, Berkshire (rhymes with Bark sure), in the search terms. This helps a bit, but not enough.  Maybe Reading tourist encouragers,  could lobby the search engine providers to introduce novel, useful, search refinements, like

  • Include word case in the search parameters and assume words starting with capitols indicate proper nouns in both web pages and search terms. Unfortunately, my random use of capitolisation means this may not work for me.
  • a ‘Rhymes with’ feature where likely options are provided for selection. The options could include words to account for variations in regional accents. I’d have such fun with that kind of option, and it would make all my searches for Reading (rhymes with wedding) both efficient and fun!

Though if leading (Rhymes with Reading and reading) was an option I’d probably pick it without realising…

leading
1 vote rating 5

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attack of the headless family

Thursday, January 13th, 2011 | tags: , , ,  |

Mini AdultsA strange mutation in body fashion can be seen in the windows of Reading’s large chain stores

Headless mannequins seemingly move towards you in a manner yet more creepy than the infamous Jackson’s mannequins

In the first Elizabethan era the fashion was to dress children in miniature forms of adult clothing.  With heads still attached, though Liz’s dad was keen on perpetuating headlessness

Since then, the English fashions for dressing children have varied greatly.  But generally there has been a clear distinction between styles for different age groups.  Youngsters are dressed distinctively. You could tell the age of a child by the clothes they wore. It looks like this dress fashion is beginning to follow the theme of  the first Elizabethan period, dress children as mini-adult and

Off with their heads!

(whatever age)

attack of the headless family
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not geographical nor alphabetical

Sunday, January 9th, 2011 | tags: , , ,  |

Israel…   …Afghanistan…          …Vietnam…

library shelvesbaffled

I was baffled

by the organisation

the organisation of the books, by country, in the Reading central library

there is some organisation principle in place

can you guess the logic behind the juxtapositions?

not geographical nor alphabetical
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China in Reading

Tuesday, January 4th, 2011 | tags: , ,  |

CMartNestled amongst the pound stores, opticians, charity shops, and estate agents of Friar Street is the CMart.

CMart – a store full of Chinese goodies. Without subtitles.

No subtitles!

While standing in the check-out line holding some packages with very enticing pictures 2 fellows behind me got very animated in what is possibly Chinese. I smiled at them and they explained in broken English that the package they were holding came from Bejing. The check-out chap smiled, I smiled, a first class purchase experience, even though I’m not sure what I bought.

I’ll be back for more happy customer and staff ambience.

PS 100 word post before the PS
China in Reading
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working wardrobe

Monday, January 3rd, 2011 | tags: , , ,  |

CulottesIn a bid to update my working wardrobe I ventured into the mahem that is Reading town centre on New Years eve. Jacksons is one of the first stores that I pass on my way into town.

Tweed wool culottes! Just what every quintessentially english gal needs in her working wardrobe

Jacksons store certainly goes where no other family store would dare to go.Trousers disguised as a skirt, in prickly wool, in a classic tweed.  Jackson’s never fails to suprise and delight.

They are the best!

Somehow, I managed to resist this little indulgence…  … will my work-colleagues bemoan my cowardice?

PS 100 word post before the PS
working wardrobe
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tree stump avoidance

Wednesday, December 22nd, 2010 | tags: , , , ,  |

walking up the hillHalfway up the Thames Valley’s infamous Streatly Bobsliegh run the Reading team stop to discuss

how best to use their cardboard sled

advanced tree-stump avoidance tactics

healthcare provision

tree stump avoidance
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